The street names carved into Brooklyn corners

These carved names are remarkable. I wonder how many other pre-war buildings have carvings in Brooklyn? If you peruse her blog — Ephemeral New York has found plenty of these lovelies all around Manhattan.

Ephemeral New York

Look up at this busy Park Slope corner, and you’ll see two street names engraved on decorative blocks: 5th Avenue (the numeral, lovely!) and Garfield Place.

The lettering is in remarkably good condition, considering that it could be 134 years old.

In 1883, two years after the assassination of President Garfield, Garfield Place became the new name of what used to be Macomb Street. (Though the Macomb name lives on engraved into another corner.)

Third Avenue and Dean Street both still exist, of course. But it’s unusual to see street names carved into marble, which decorates the facade of a New York Times‘ 20th century printing plant on this Boerum Hill corner.

The former printing plant now houses a school, which features these wonderful original Art Deco bas reliefs.

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Buffalo Bill’s traveling show in NYC!

 

 

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Read about the event at the great Ephemeral New York blog:

https://ephemeralnewyork.wordpress.com/2017/07/17/buffalo-bills-wild-west-show-thrills-1894-brooklyn/

A Buffalo Bill 5th Avenue Parade filmed by Thomas Edison in 1902.

Turn of the Century NYC Google Maps

Brooklynbridge-construction-1879

The Brooklyn Bridge under construction around 1880.

New York is a dynamic city that’s forever transforming. Buildings rise and fall, stores and restaurants come and go and the landscape evolves with new developments in housing and parks. It’s hard to keep up with all the changes and remember what it used to look like. If you enjoy browsing the interactive images from Google Street maps of the present, how would you like it from a 19th century view?

oldnyc-mappage

Developer Dan Vanderkam has partnered with the New York Public Library and their massive photo archives to create just that. You could spend hours zooming in and out on familiar streets and landmark areas just by clicking on the red dot. The vintage photos are linked straight from the NYPL website.

Begin your journey to the past here at OLDNYC