The Brooklyn Public Library digital Collection

fc0007v

Brooklyn takes its history seriously and has the digital resources to prove it. I was browsing the new and improved BPL website – I really miss living in Brooklyn since my big out-of-state move – There’s a wealth of newly digitized information, articles, and photographs just waiting to be discovered! Sign yourself up for a Virtual Library card if you don’t already have a BPL card.

How would you like to browse through Phone Directories and City Listings over 500 pages long going back to 1856? You may find your ancestors listed.

There are 20,000 digital historical photos with the option to purchase for personal, commercial or educational use.

Civil War Buff? History Teacher? Student? Browse Brooklyn In the Civil War for information, pictures, and lesson plans.

I could keep listing, but why not just go directly to the Collections Page and see for yourself. They’ve added a bounty of treasures from Theater playbills to a digital collection of American and European Children’s books.

Advertisements

1900’s Family History

My Maternal great-grandfather and great-grandmother were mentioned in the Brooklyn Daily Eagle for an engagement and wedding announcement between the years 1911 and 1912.

I believe it was common in that era to run ads for special announcements like this. Particularly if you had a higher standing in society. Newspapers in the past often posted the address of the people mentioned in their articles. Today that’d be an extremely dangerous thing to do.

If your family has roots in Brooklyn going back between the publication years of 1841 – 1955, use the search engine on the The Brooklyn Newsstand Archive  to type in names and events. You may find your ancestors mentioned. It’s a fun and educational resource provided by the Brooklyn Public Library for history buffs, writers, bloggers, and anyone who wants to know the newsworthy events, lifestyles, and interests of Brooklynites during the Nineteenth and early Twentieth Century.

the_brooklyn_daily_eagle_sun__dec_31__1911_

the_brooklyn_daily_eagle_wed__nov_27__1912_

The Bowery Boys Podcasts

111515_bowery_boys_181

(Image from The Bowery Boys: New York City History website. I adore this photo of them! Hope they don’t mind that I linked it. O_O)

I love the idea of podcasts, but the reality is I never seem to find time to listen as I’d like to. But the one that has me tuning in is The Bowery Boys, a podcast all about old New York hosted by two cute guys, Greg Young and Tom Meyers. I’m a new (ish) fan, but The Bowery Boys have podcasts going back 9 years and counting!

I have a ton of catching up to do! They’re active on Facebook – Adventures of Old New York. They’ve given online interviews, been featured in all sorts of media and make frequent appearances around New York to share their knowledge of its rich history.

Mr. Young and Mr. Meyers have thoughtfully created a Podcast archive for fans and history buffs. They offer various ways to listen and they are available on iTunes.

Be sure to bookmark this page!

Every Bowery Boys Podcast in Chronological order by subject

I’m happy to note they’ve released their first History Book in June 2016 available in Print and on Kindle –

Bowery-Boys-Book-Cover-R6-revised

I find the Bowery Boys Podcasts factual, insightful, and fun. The guys are witty and funny without being raucous or annoying. You can tell they have a deep knowledge and love for the topics they discuss. I also admire that they keep their broadcasts fairly clean and profanity free, even when discussing the most shocking scandals from back in the Golden age.

Keep it classy guys! You’re awesome!

I enjoy how they set the stage with subtle and meaningful background music and I’m drawn into the air of mystery they create when discussing the strange tales of the past. The imagination ignites. Those are my favorite kinds of stories – missing persons, crimes, cons, and all the intrigue that Old New York has to offer.

Two juicy ones that come to mind are “The curious case of Typhoid Mary” and “The disappearance of Dorothy Arnold.”

Settle down, grab a snack, do some knitting, or just lay back and close your eyes and let the Bowery Boys transport you to the past.